Ashley Likes That Grand Is Mostly An Unknown

Ashley Casey 1502 HartwellClassic day3presser trophy 574 BF-1

Photo BassFan: Since the end of the Bassmaster Elite Series regular season last August, Casey Ashley figures he’s spent fewer than 10 days on any body of water with a rod and reel in his hands.

Just this past Monday, he wet a line on Lake Hartwell for the first time since capturing the Bassmaster Classic title there 347 days ago. He’d done some video work on the lake a couple weeks ago, but he hadn’t intentionally made a cast until this week.

“It’s been warm here and the water’s still warm,” he said. “They’re biting. The dumb ones are up shallow and biting. I was just excited to get to go fishing.”

To say it’s been a busy offseason for the reigning Classic champ would be an understatement. It’s been an adjustment for the South Carolina native, who refers to himself as a “homebody.”

“It has been a roller coaster ride for sure,” Ashley said, “and it’s still going. You really find out how valuable your time is now – what time you do have for yourself.”

He said the most hectic portion of the offseason is mostly behind him, but he still has a boat show to be at this weekend and a trip to Florida planned for next week before he can start to sharpen his focus on the Elite Series season ahead.

“I’d like to fish, but you have to do what you have to do,” he said. “I’ll get going soon on things once I get squared away with all of this travel.” BassFan Article

 

Chesapeake Bay Proving Stingy for Elite Pros

If you’ve ever fished all day without a bite, don’t be embarrassed—it happens to Bassmaster Classic champions too. In fact, sometimes, like this week, they fish not one, but two long days without a single bite.

A social media post Monday evening from 2009 Bassmaster Classic Champion Skeet Reese was the first warning shot fired as to how tough fishing is this week at the Bassmaster Elite tournament on the Chesapeake Bay.

“That stinks! A 13-hour day on the Chesapeake without a bite,” posted Reese following the first official practice day on Monday.
Current Bassmaster Classic champion Casey Ashley will be quick to tell you Reese was not alone. Read More

 

Why You Should Fish a Mop Jig More for Bass

Ever watch male turkeys during their spring strutting rituals? Bent on attracting hens with impressive displays, gobblers proudly strut their stuff with one key objective – maximizing their profile.

Head back, wing tips dragging, tail fully fanned and feathers flared, the long beards figure bigger is better when it comes to wooing the gals. In a way, the same principle applies to mop jigs for bass—sometimes, you just need to show the fish a puffed-up, flared-out profile.

Particularly when summer’s heat makes the midday period tough, Bassmaster Classic champ and Elite Series pro Casey Ashley will reach for a brown mop jig with a green pumpkin Zoom Super Chunk trailer because he knows it presents the right image to interest bass.

“I like a mop jig, especially in the post spawn (when the fish are moving out to deeper water),” Ashley said. “They don’t really want to move much, so when they eat, they want to eat something big.” Read Story

 

Lake Hartwell named one of America's best bass lakes

In the newly released July/August issue of Bassmaster Magazine, B.A.S.S. named Lake Hartwell among the 100 Best Bass Lakes in America. Since the 2012 inaugural ranking, this is the first time Lake Hartwell has made the list.

According to B.A.S.S., “This year’s Bassmaster Classic venue illustrated just how good this lake can be even under the toughest of conditions. Casey Ashley won on the strength of his final-day 20.3 limit, giving him 50.1 over three days. And remember, this was in brutally cold conditions. The spotted bass here have all grown up, and 3-pounders abound.” Read More

 

Curse of the Bassmaster Classic

In the end, the Curse of the Bassmaster Classic won't be denied.

Officially, the Curse involves an angler who lives in the same state the Bassmaster Classic is held in being unable to capitalize on home lake advantage to win the prestigious tournament.

Since the 1970s, a local state angler had never won the Bassmaster Classic until 2007 when Boyd Duckett did it at Lay Lake. In 2014, Alabama angler Randy Howell won the Classic on Lake Guntersville even though there's some debate if being born and raised in North Carolina makes Howell a true Alabama native.

Everyone in the state of South Carolina knows that local Donalds, angler Casey Ashley won this year on Lake Hartwell and with back-to-back local champions, being Howell at Guntersville and Ashley at Hartwell, many said the curse was defeated. Maybe it was just delayed. Checking in with Ashley at the break in the 2015 Bassmaster Elite season, Ashley unashamedly admits he's having the worst tour season of his career.

"So far I've not done so well in the five events I've fished on the tour," Ashley said. "I had a pretty decent showing at Lake Havasu in the desert. I made the top 10. Other than that, I'm just not catching the right fish." Read More

 


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