“You always dream of fishing the Bassmaster Classic on your home lake, but to be able to win it on your home lake? This is a dream come true.” - Casey

Ashley Likes That Grand Is Mostly An Unknown

Ashley Casey 1502 HartwellClassic day3presser trophy 574 BF-1

Photo BassFan: Since the end of the Bassmaster Elite Series regular season last August, Casey Ashley figures he’s spent fewer than 10 days on any body of water with a rod and reel in his hands.

Just this past Monday, he wet a line on Lake Hartwell for the first time since capturing the Bassmaster Classic title there 347 days ago. He’d done some video work on the lake a couple weeks ago, but he hadn’t intentionally made a cast until this week.

“It’s been warm here and the water’s still warm,” he said. “They’re biting. The dumb ones are up shallow and biting. I was just excited to get to go fishing.”

To say it’s been a busy offseason for the reigning Classic champ would be an understatement. It’s been an adjustment for the South Carolina native, who refers to himself as a “homebody.”

“It has been a roller coaster ride for sure,” Ashley said, “and it’s still going. You really find out how valuable your time is now – what time you do have for yourself.”

He said the most hectic portion of the offseason is mostly behind him, but he still has a boat show to be at this weekend and a trip to Florida planned for next week before he can start to sharpen his focus on the Elite Series season ahead.

“I’d like to fish, but you have to do what you have to do,” he said. “I’ll get going soon on things once I get squared away with all of this travel.” BassFan Article

 

Why You Should Fish a Mop Jig More for Bass

Ever watch male turkeys during their spring strutting rituals? Bent on attracting hens with impressive displays, gobblers proudly strut their stuff with one key objective – maximizing their profile.

Head back, wing tips dragging, tail fully fanned and feathers flared, the long beards figure bigger is better when it comes to wooing the gals. In a way, the same principle applies to mop jigs for bass—sometimes, you just need to show the fish a puffed-up, flared-out profile.

Particularly when summer’s heat makes the midday period tough, Bassmaster Classic champ and Elite Series pro Casey Ashley will reach for a brown mop jig with a green pumpkin Zoom Super Chunk trailer because he knows it presents the right image to interest bass.

“I like a mop jig, especially in the post spawn (when the fish are moving out to deeper water),” Ashley said. “They don’t really want to move much, so when they eat, they want to eat something big.” Read Story

 

Tune up that popping bait

Pro fisherman Casey Ashley, the reigning Bassmaster Classic champion, loves his popper fishing. He’s particularly fond of the XCalibur Zell Pop, but even though the bait comes ready for action, Ashley makes a few adjustments to ensure he gets the performance he needs.

• Split ring. A little extra mobility on the nose helps him keep the bait moving.

• Upsize hooks. “This bait comes with No. 6 hooks, but I change it to No. 4s. What that does is it makes the bait sit down in the water a little more and allows me to work it faster,” he said.

“Changing hooks also makes the bait sit flatter. That way, when you chug it, the bait doesn’t dive; it just spits and walks.” Read More

 

A different kind of tough

By Casey Ashley GUNTERSVILLE, Ala. – Folks, I don’t want this to come across the wrong way.

I think Lake Guntersville is one of the Top 10 bass-fishing destinations in the country, and if I was going to pick a lake anywhere in America just to go fishing for fun, it would certainly be on my short list.

But this is not my favorite place for a professional bass tournament.

For what we do, it’s downright tough.

I don’t mean it’s tough to catch fish. There’s an amazing amount of bass here, and anyone who knows much at all about fishing is going to catch them. Read Full Story

 

No Surprise A Song Aided Ashley's Classic Win

By Alan McGuckin - BassFan Those that listened closely to Casey Ashley talk from the Bassmaster Classic weigh-in stage heard him make a quick reference to a song that got inside his head the night before the final day of competition and steered him to victory.

Drill a little deeper and Ashley confirmed that the song’s lyrics lead to breaking up with his favorite lure the night before, all in an effort to capture the most celebrated 35-pound trophy in the sport the next day.

“If you’d have asked me before the Classic started to name the lure I might win on, I’d have told you a jig,” said Ashley, who eventually won on a homemade horsehead spin his father, Danny, made for him.

To those that know the humble 31-year-old’s overly simple approach to life, that answer would come as no great surprise, because while Ashley hardly one-dimensional in his lure selection, the jig is the one lure he leans on more often than any other to keep confusion out of his tournament game.

Sure enough, Ashley danced with the one that brought him as the tournament began.

“I spent a ton of time – I mean a ton of time – throwing a jig in practice and one particular day, I had 30 bites on it,” he said.

Further confessing how his love affair with a half-ounce Knights Custom Lures Dock Buster jig nearly lead him to heartbreak in the biggest tournament of his life, he admits, “The bites I had on the jig in practice gave me so much confidence that I burned 10 hours of tournament time the first two days of the Classic trying to make ‘em eat it.”

“I was lying in bed the night before the final day of competition thinking about how the jig was letting me down,” he continued, “and I’m not sure why, because I hadn’t listened to it in a while, but Why Lady Why popped into my mind. Full Story

 


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